Author Topic: About old airplanes  (Read 4482 times)

Offline Stef

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About old airplanes
« on: November 15, 2005, 11:34:49 AM »
Okay, today's strip is a classic joke. Two classic jokes actually rolled into one strip.

When I was drawing it I was thinking a bit about old airplanes... I admit that when I first found out that most planes were usually older than I was (I was a bit younger when I realized that), it felt kinda awkward. It's hard to imagine that any kind of machinery works longer than ten years in todays throwaway society. It makes me wonder why we can't build other stuff that lasts as long as an airplane, if you take care of it. At the airfiels of our hometown there's an old german reconnaissance plane from WWII that still has its original battery, which is still working after over 60 years. Mike might tell you more about it, because I think he worked on that plane. Anyway, I'd love to have a battery like that for my car! :)

Offline Sleek-Jet

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Re: About old airplanes
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2005, 05:40:21 PM »
Old (well cared for) airplanes and equipment are the best.  My '59 182 was a sweethart, no corrosion and it flew 10 times better than a new airplane.  The FBO where I worked at has a working WWII era Southwind pre-heater, the kind that you see warming up B17 engines in the war films. 

But if stuff was built like that today, no one would need new things now, would we???
A pilot is a confused soul who talks about women when he's around airplanes, and airplanes when he's around women.

Offline Ted_Stryker

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Re: About old airplanes
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2005, 07:56:30 PM »
How very true!  It does seem that most (not all, but most), new products are designed with built-in obsolesence and entropy in mind for the purposes of maintaining a market.  Of course, that's "progress" right?

I once flew an old Air Force version of the Cessna 172 on a C.A.P. "Form 5" Checkride.  It's engine was old, but still chugged smoothly (if a bit underpowered), and the instruments and control yoke were old, but it flew wonderfully.  To give you an idea, the Heading Indicator, or as us "old timers" that learned to fly in the mid-1980's remember it, the Directional Gyro, on this plane was actually a moving horizontal tape visible through a rectangular window.  No circular card... just a bigger, stabilized version of a mag compass.  The Attitude Indicator, aka Artificial Horizon Gauge, markings were old, but surprisingly easier to read as it appeared less cluttery than the ones today (finer graphics lines on the facings).  The control yoke was the old "figure 8" on it's side style that was popular for a long time in Beach's and Cessna's in the 1950's.

My only regret was that I only got 1.5 hours in that machine :)  Of course, my flight in a Ford Tri-Motor that I got to fly as S.I.C. was quite an experience too!  I learned a lot about old aircraft that day too.

Oldies... but goodies   ;D
We're going to have to come in pretty low!  It's just one of those things you have to do... when you land!  -- Ted Striker - Airplane!

Offline Stef

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Re: About old airplanes
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2005, 10:24:00 PM »
Well, I wouldn't call it progress, but market economy or economic growth. If you can sell something once, or some other product three times for half the price, people will buy the cheaper one. But then part of it is really progress maybe, when technologies become outdated. Concerning airplanes, I always wonder if there'll be more fuel efficient or engines soon or engines powered by some alternative energy source. I mean, considering the development of oil prices... But then, a Mustang with an electric motor would feel very wrong indeed...  :)