Author Topic: Foreign pilot / local rules?  (Read 5361 times)

Offline cotejy

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Foreign pilot / local rules?
« on: September 08, 2008, 12:37:47 PM »
Ok, I'm not 100% sure but I heard that in the United States, you can fly with a commercial license at night or IFR with a single engine. In Canada, at night or IFR on single engine, everyone license privileges are as a private license. I'm not sure what rule this is exactly but this is what I was told when I got my private license. I'm a little confuse because it wouldn't make sense to me that you can't fly IFR a Cessna Caravan commercially.

Anyway, what happens to a Canadian pilot who fly in the US? Let's say I have a commercial license and I'm flying some cargo from Toronto to somewhere in the US on a single engine. Can I start the flight in the daylight and land in the US at night? In other terms, do you fly under the regulation of the country you're in or the country that issued your license?

Offline Fabo

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Re: Foreign pilot / local rules?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2008, 12:50:54 PM »
Mybe they were just trying to tell you that in Canada you have to separately get Night/IFR, while in the US it is automatic with CPL?
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Offline Rooster Cruiser

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Re: Foreign pilot / local rules?
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2008, 12:18:49 PM »
The regs specify that to fly a single engine airplane for hire in IFR conditions, it must have dual sources of power for the required flight instruments.  This means you need dual alternators/generators and/or dual vacuum pumps.  You can fly a Cessna 172 under part 135 regs IFR if you have the dual systems.  There are a number of 135 operators that fly the PC12 in both the USA and Canada, and this is approved because they were designed with a dual alternator/generator source (EFIS instruments so no vacuum pumps for gyro instruments).  There are also a number of 135 operators flying passengers in C208's in IFR conditions also.  Its just a matter of meeting the requirements.

RC
« Last Edit: April 21, 2009, 06:44:40 AM by Rooster Cruiser »
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Offline Louis

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Re: Foreign pilot / local rules?
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2009, 05:04:08 AM »
I hope you won't mind me resurrecting this thread, if only for "cultural" purposes...

First, licences:

A "regular" Canadian CPL gives day and night VFR, plus VFR OTT privileges with the ability of flying for hire.
Things you can add on it: float-rating, multi-engine rating, instructor rating (a single rating with four different classes allowing you to before chief-flight instructor and to eventually train new instructors), IFR (group 3 single-engine, 2 centreline thrust, 1 normal multi), IATRA exam (which enables you to fly "high performance" aircraft, here meaning Vne >= 250 KIAS or Vso >= 80 KIAS that require a type rating, not to be confused with a CARs part VII Pilot Proficiency Check a.k.a PPC.)

A "regular" FAA CPL gives day and night VFR privileges with the ability of flying for hire. Without a valid IFR you are not allowed to carry passenger on cross-country flight of more than 50 nautical miles or at night. No such thing as a VFR OTT rating in the US afaik.
Things you can add on it: float rating, multi-engine rating, the different instructor ratings, IFR, tailwheel endorsement, high-performance endorsement (engine over 200hp), complex endorsement (flaps, retractable landing gear, constant-speed prop). The last three don't have any equivalent in Canada, matter of fact the concept of logbook endorsements was entirely foreign to me before I got my FAA certificate. (Sure we might sign the hours in a logbook, but that's pretty much it.)

Second, single engine IFR commercial operations:

As explained by Rooster Cruiser, you can fly a single engine piston for IFR on demand charter (part 135) in the US whereas you can't in Canada under a part 703 commercial operators certificate.

Canadian rules for night VFR and IFR under 703 require either a twin or a factory built single engine turbine airplane with a minimum proven MTBF of 1 failure in 100000 hours or less.

So a Caravan, PC-12, TBM or Meridian would all qualify, but not an STC re-engined PT-6 Turbo Beaver or a TPE311 engined Caravan for instance. (See CARs 703.22 and 723.22 for more)

About jurisdiction, you pretty much fly under both set of rules. If you're *really* in a bind, the Chicago convention might have more answers...

Goodbye,

Louis

Offline Rooster Cruiser

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Re: Foreign pilot / local rules?
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2009, 06:49:11 AM »
Quote
As explained by Rooster Cruiser, you can fly a single engine piston for IFR on demand charter (part 135) in the US whereas you can't in Canada under a part 703 commercial operators certificate.

Thanks for the clarification Louis.  I have no Canadian experience so that was new to me.  Interesting that the Factory turbine singles are OK but field conversions like the Turbine Beavers and Otters are not.

RC
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Offline Fabo

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Re: Foreign pilot / local rules?
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2009, 06:57:04 AM »
Interesting, but quite logical, really. If you think about it, it improves the odds of safety, as for at least there is one throughout holder for the plane as a complex, whereas on conversion, you would most likely have different certificates for the body and wings (that would be the original manufacturer), engine itself, supplied as-is (engine manufacturer) and another one for conversion (that would most likely be the company doing the actual job). Plus, factory built planes are designed more or less from scratch to work in that very combination of engine, body, wings, avionics, etc.
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