Author Topic: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.  (Read 6532 times)

Offline AirScorp

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General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« on: June 20, 2008, 03:39:31 PM »
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IAOPA changes attitudes in Athens

By AOPA ePublishing staff

General aviation, as we understand it in the United States, is practically nonexistent in Greece. Which is precisely why the various AOPA groups of the world decided to hold their biennial World Assembly in Athens from June 9 through 14.

“Yiouli Kalafati, president of AOPA Hellas (Greece), wanted to show Greek authorities what they could gain by promoting, rather than restricting, general aviation,” said Phil Boyer, president of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA). “And the presence of general aviation representatives from 26 different nations around the world helped change attitudes in Athens.”

There are fewer than 300 GA aircraft in Greece, airport services are limited and expensive, the military controls most of the airports and all of the airspace, and all VFR flying is done on a flight plan with mandatory reporting points.

But it could be so much more, as Boyer explained to Kostas Hatzidakis, the Greek minister of transportation and communications. “General aviation provides a unique and flexible form of transportation for both individuals and businesses seeking to maximize their time; we connect people to the world of opportunity via a fast, economical, and enjoyable form of transportation. We fill in the blanks left by public and commercial transportation,” Boyer said.

Hatzidakis agreed that general aviation was an essential form of transportation within Greece that would receive increased attention from his ministry. “His perspective on GA was positive and forward looking,” Boyer said. “This attitude can only help the cause of GA in Greece. We are pleased to see that holding our World Assembly in Greece has had a positive effect on the government’s perception of GA.”

Some 125 delegates and observers from around the world attended the twenty-fourth IAOPA World Assembly. And the delegates dealt with issues that concern pilots everywhere, including in the United States.

On the issues of fees, the delegates passed a resolution, urging airport operators and air navigation service providers to charge only for services actually required and received, to consult with all user groups regarding changes to existing charges, and to prepare a cost-benefit analysis on each charging scheme for each user community. And the pilots from other nations counseled U.S. pilots to continue resisting user fees. Direct user charges have only harmed GA in other parts of the world.

IAOPA resolved to urge national and international regulatory authorities to permit affordable and practical alternatives to emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) for general aviation. International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) guidelines currently call for 406-MHz ELTs in GA aircraft, and many national regulatory bodies are making the rule mandatory for any aircraft flying in their airspace. But IAOPA asked that aircraft owners be allowed to select an alerting and locating option that is “appropriate for their type and area of operations,” including relatively inexpensive personal locator beacons.

Security is an issue around the world, and officials everywhere tend to respond by clamping airline-like restrictions on general aviation. But that’s not necessary or appropriate for GA. IAOPA will urge security and airport officials to park GA aircraft in non-security restricted areas, to provide access through non-security sensitive perimeter access points, and to abolish or absorb mandatory security handling charges for GA aircraft.

At the end of the assembly AOPA Hellas sponsored Icarus 2008, the first airshow and general aviation Aero Expo in Athens at the Tatoi military airfield outside of Athens.

Said Boyer, “AOPA Hellas President Yiouli Kalafati and her entire organization provided us a wonderful platform from which to conduct our deliberations and a memorable series of events that we will long remember as one of our best assemblies.”

The World Assembly is held every two years to permit the Board of IAOPA to meet and consider the issues facing aviation and to develop action plans to promote and protect general aviation interests worldwide.

IAOPA represents the interests of its 66 worldwide affiliates comprising more than 480,000 pilots and operators of general aviation aircraft. IAOPA headquarters are in Frederick, Md.

June 19, 2008

http://www.aopa.org/advocacy/articles/2008/080613iaopa.html

I think I want to whine a bit, but it won't sound funny  ::rofl::
Just felt I should put it in a thread.. To bad I had to miss the weekend.. There'd be a LOT of planes to see and admire  ;D
It's all Greek to me!

airtac

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2008, 11:07:18 PM »
I read the article on AOPA website today---Interesting stats and it reminds me of how lucky we are here in the US---AOPA members here in the states number about half a million which is about the same number as IAOPA members representing 66 countries......................

I've belonged to AOPA since 1959 and I'm sure without their input, GA would be much different (more restricted) than it is today,   I strongly urge all pilots to join, AOPA is OUR voice in a hostile world

Offline AirScorp

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2008, 02:29:12 AM »
So maybe I will whine a bit, but mostly for the sake of curiosity than anything else.. You guys have given me insight multiple times and if I may add, always with a laid-back humorous way which I love  ;D *"too serious" disclaimer here*

My conclusion after a couple of years of following the aviation scene in Greece is this.. GA is practically nonexistant though enthusiastic, it's a lot of pain and expensive.. And that's practically the end of it. We have a couple of airline outfits, a smaller private company or two, a couple of schools that can get you a CPL, half a dozen more to get your PPL and that with prices you could easily go get the license anywhere else in the world.. Corporate jobs, middle level as I call them or simple FI jobs are as scarce as GA is. So, apart from sharing a sports plane (Microlight) AFTER I get a well paid job, however cool that is, home seems like a dead-end..

It has crossed my mind more than once (more than once every day lately) to become a professional pilot. I'm young enough to not really think about paychecks and be content with what will pay the bank and still earn me what a job flipping burgers would (that strip is still my favorite! ::bow:: ). The states sound pretty good to do just that. Oz too.. Europe, not so much. I'm thinking I'll have to overcome certain difficulties, like finding a good school to get me there and offer me a job as an FI to build hours after the rating. Or, very importantly, finding the whole bunch of money upfront. Or then finding an outfit that will take the hassle to have me work on a visa instead of hiring the next kid who, after all, is in his own country.
Still, I do believe it's doable and, since I can't do it in my back yard anyway, why not opt for somewhere the odds look best?

But I fear maybe I'm idealising the whole deal.. I do lack information and first-hand experience of how the aviation world is anywhere else. I just hear the words of my pilot friend after he gave me my first ride/unofficial lesson on his small plane ring to my head: "If you have the cash, go to the States. Flying just seems like you"  |:)\

Ok, 5 am ranting after-friday-night-out, thought-I-share time is over. Give some humor guys and I'll go grab a beer  ::rofl:: ::drinking:: ::drinking:: ::drinking::
It's all Greek to me!

Offline leiafee

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2008, 10:48:15 AM »
I've quoted what you told me about GA in Greece to several UKside friends who gripe and moan how hard we have it here!  Worked a treat as a whinge-session stopper ;-)

If you really don't think you can work in flying there, and that's really what you want to do then the options are a tough set.

Life's too short not to do what you love!

Offline AirScorp

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2008, 01:54:16 PM »
I've quoted what you told me about GA in Greece to several UKside friends who gripe and moan how hard we have it here!  Worked a treat as a whinge-session stopper ;-)
If you really don't think you can work in flying there, and that's really what you want to do then the options are a tough set.
Life's too short not to do what you love!

Leia, I loved the airport you have there.. Cozy, great people, nice planes, heck even the cook in the cafeteria was a crazy figure  ::rofl:: And the "carrier-landing" on the hilly runway.. Great weekend we had there  ;D

Thing is, I'm going to the army in August for a year and it seems to me that when I get back it's going to be a decisive point in time for me.. To make the leap of faith if the puzzle pieces fit together and do it for a living or to stay and do it as a hobby.. That's why I'm thinking of it all the more right now
It's all Greek to me!

airtac

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2008, 05:15:44 PM »
Schools over here are begging for flight instructors---and paying better then ever.  Friend, there is a pilot shortage now and it is going to get more so, if you want to fly then quit planning and start working toward that end |:)\

I realize that's a general statement but you have to take the first step beyond planning to get any plan in motion and I wish you the absolute best luck in taking that first action |:)\

Offline AirScorp

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2008, 10:27:39 PM »
Hehe Airtac!  |:)\ So much wisdom in a couple of phrases. It took me a lot of years to understand that exact thing: At some point you've got to stop planning and start acting  ;D

Anyways, going to the army now was a purposeful decision. It's obligatory (civil service I think it's called) and it's best I've completed it before anything else.. It's only tying loose ends but it is one step  |:)\
It's all Greek to me!

Offline Rooster Cruiser

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2008, 06:28:09 AM »
Nick, good luck in your service obligation!   |:)\  That is only voluntary in America, but I felt it necessary to do it in my younger years.  I am glad to say that I did it, and I can say it made me a better man.

Once you get out, lets see how we can help you with your dreams.

RC
"Me and Earl was haulin' chickens / On a flatbed outta Wiggins..."

Wolf Creek Pass, by CW McCall

Offline Oddball

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2008, 09:35:55 AM »
good luck nick  |:)\ was in the Territorrial Army for a bit myself some of the physical training instructors where right barstools.
"You can teach monkeys to fly better than that!"and "spring chicken to sh**e hawk in one easy lesson"

Offline AirScorp

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2008, 10:40:12 AM »
good luck nick  |:)\ was in the Territorrial Army for a bit myself some of the physical training instructors where right barstools.

Oddball  ::knockedout:: What the heck is a right barstool anyway?  ::rofl::
It's all Greek to me!

Offline leiafee

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2008, 02:44:20 PM »
Hehe Airtac!  |:)\ So much wisdom in a couple of phrases. It took me a lot of years to understand that exact thing: At some point you've got to stop planning and start acting  ;D

Hmm how does it run...  "Planning without action is a dream -- action without planning is a nightmare!"

Quote from: AirScorp
Leia, I loved the airport you have there.. Cozy, great people, nice planes, heck even the cook in the cafeteria was a crazy figure   And the "carrier-landing" on the hilly runway.. Great weekend we had there 

Charles the Reggae Cook is an airfield institution ;-)  It's a good place!

Offline Oddball

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2008, 03:56:41 PM »
ill email you the meaning nick if i said it here ill end up getting deep sixed lol
"You can teach monkeys to fly better than that!"and "spring chicken to sh**e hawk in one easy lesson"

Offline AirScorp

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2008, 01:56:22 AM »
Oh man Charles! The only thing missing with him on the airport was some Bob Marley on the speakers! Very nice fellow!
It's all Greek to me!

Offline Fabo

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Re: General aviation, is practically nonexistent in Greece.
« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2008, 08:01:57 PM »
I am almost starting to envy you :o
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."