Thanks to some quick thinking Julio might get a spotless aircraft out of this whole deal. But there probably might be more tears to wipe up after the checkride if Chuck actually has to answer any questions about CRM and a sterile cockpit. In the initial documents, the FAA was mainly talking about multi crew requirements with recommendations of refraining from non-essential activities (specifically bulls#!tting) in the cockpit during critical phases of flight generally below 10,000 feet. This might not work for Chuck anyway since a Cessna 172 will struggle to even make it that far up there. I’m sure Julio is aware of all of this, but there is no sense in telling Chuck right away, or ever for that matter.

In fire flying with a multi crew helicopter, where we are almost always below 10,000 feet, we still use the sterile cockpit rule but in a slightly different way since we have very critical phases of flight if you can imagine, possibly even more critical than landing a plane with computer assistance. We have a sterile cockpit while in the dip site, taking on water, or while we are lining up for a water drop. Our aerial coordinator usually also know not to bother us during these phases as well.
As far as sterility goes the way Chuck understands it … a fire/utility Chinook helicopter is probably a lot less “sterile” than an airliner …